About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CNBC 26
CSPAN 12
CSPAN2 5
KCSM (PBS) 5
MSNBCW 4
KQEH (PBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
MSNBC 2
KQED (PBS) 1
WETA 1
LANGUAGE
English 61
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 68 (some duplicates have been removed)
in recent history? and if things are so bad why haven't the british like say the people of greece or spain taken to the streets? to discuss this i'm joined by ian beg who is a research fellow at the london school of economics. so professor beg, we hear talk this being the worst recession since the second world war. is it? >> it's been a long recession and it's very slow to see any kind of recovery. but it's also worth remembering statistically although being one of the worst in the last century, we actually today are as well off as in 2006. we've only gone back by a few steps. >> is it simply a case that it feels like the worst recession that anyone can remember? >> it's the fact that it hasn't gone to a recovery phase. tore used to in a recession have a deep downturn followed bay quite rapid recovery. it takes longer to readdress individual positions in their debt. and that means that it lasts much longer than everybody expects because everybody tries to save. >> so if things aren't very bleak across europe, why is it that in some countries as in greece and in spain we've seen the protest
of our top stories from 2012. spain -- wide business is booming. armenia -- why chess is compulsory in schools. and ireland -- why deserters had to wait decades to be pardoned. eu leaders met to discuss how much solidarity they were prepared to show with the weakest members of the eurozone. in the end, the you chose not to abandon them, but greece continues to have to make drastic cuts, leaving marks that are visible throughout the country, including a long one of the world's most famous routes -- along one of the world's most famous routes. ♪ >> at precisely 42,195 meters long, this is the route that has become the standard for all marathon runners. the course was inspired by a 2500-year old myth, only today it is run on asphalt along with the capital's main roads. this is the bay where it said the lenda battle took place in 490 bc. it marked the first greek victory over the persians. according to legend, the athenian warriors gathered in a phalanx formation and managed to fight off a persian invasion. then a messenger ran the 42- kilometer distance to athens with news of the vic
of the main events of the task 12 months. >> in europe, it was all about the debt crisis. greece and spain were the worst hit. >> eventually, it was the european central bank's controversial bond-buying program that manage to come down the markets -- calm down the markets. >> germany's finance minister says he thinks the worst is behind us. is he right? >> the wildfires in 2012 were the worst spain had experienced in years, but it was not the only disaster the country had to deal with. the financial sector was also in flames. right from the beginning of the year, it was clear that the eurozone had a tough time ahead. credit rating agencies handed out significant downgrades to spain and portugal in particular. europe's firefighting coalition of finance ministers hoped a fiscal pact with tight budgetary controls and national debt breaks would need future crises in the bud, but some economists were more realistic. >> the fiscal pact was basically superfluous. we already knew that all the countries were trying to cut back. weather or not they continue making cuts in 2018, which is what the fis
a look at the bond curve. spain, this will be a good proxy for now. we'll get the ten year for italy in just a second. 35.34% is the level there. u.s. benefiting from fund flows well. choppy trade across the picture here. let's look at the italian curve before we get the results later today. we are seeing green across the board, so yields dipping before that probably has more to do with the political rhetoric we're seeing especially coming from berlusconi. under 4.6% for the ten-year and on the short and two, a bit of a rally. finally, let's close taking a look at the forex. euro/dollar is weaker. and it's holding just above 1.30. and the dollar/yen, this is the one sixuan mentioned to watch. heading into japanese elections, stocks outperform adding oots .1% to 83.35 this morning. >>> south korea's central bank may be worried about factors in the economy, but the dok says the economy is stronger than it used to be. more on that next. can i help you? i heard you guys can ship ground for less than the ups store. that's right. i've learned the only way to get a holiday deal is to camp o
small to view. i think what really bothers me is spain which i think clearly bothers the whole market. the question, a growth going to fall off a cliff or whether it muddle through and a bailout will be sufficient. as you say, we don't know the answer to that question. that remains the tail risk. until we do get close to a resolution, i'm not going to turn massively bullish. >> what's your view on that? >> i think i go along very much with what he's saying. >> what is your view on what happens to spanish growth? >> i think spain has a lot of problems at the moment. it's not seeing a lot in the domestic market. not seeing it move toward an export. in which case spanish growth is going to be very, very weak for some time to come. >> all right. good to see you. thanks very much. alan will stick around. time to bring you today's global markets report. let's go to asia for the update. >> that upbeat pmi data failed to lift greater china markets. there is pessimism over general lack of policy and also fears that over 800 companies lining up for ipos could further drain liquidity out of the
economies like spain -- >> good or bad surprise? >> no, a good surprise. whereas economies like spain, greece, portugal are likely to stay in recession for the whole year, i would argue there's a high probability that italy will come out of recession towards the end of the second quarter. >> and that seems to be the real concern that is in the market today, whether the political upheaval, even the campaigning by berlusconi could undo some of that progress. >> i think the key point is will the reform programs that have been initiated by the monte government, will they stay intact? i think there's a reasonable chance, they've had a more than reasonable chance that that is the case. yes, it's not surprising, we have the sell off today. it's inest knowledge that as the campaigning builds up, investors will be nervous.. the move by investors back into italian bonds over the next few months, we could see some exits. but i think if we get a sensible election results, and i think we probably will, then the reform program will be intact and the new government will stick to the budget that is g
ftse up 9 out of the last 11. we have seen yields continue to decline in spain. just 5.23%, but still capped. spain requesting financial assistance. we'll keep our eye on the uk as we head toward the bank of england meeting this week p. dollar index has hit a one month low. you're redollar up to euro-dollar up near the high we saw yesterday. dollar-yen moving away from the 7 1/2 month high. rebounding against the dollar and the euro ir, as well. priced in a lot in terms of monetary policy out of japan. and aussie dollar, 1.0463, yes, we have cut the cash rate in australia to match the record low of 3%. but we see the aussie dollar rise because it's pretty much all priced in. sterling-dollar also getting a benefit. back over 1.61. so that's where we stand in european trade. let's recap the asian trading session for the first time today, when you not the last. >> thank you, ross.not the last. >> thank you, ross. shanghai composite recovered from its four year low as property financials, rebounded. shale gas and geothermal plays also rallied as beijing plans to cut its annual coal consum
in the harder hit regions. ftse mib, spain up better than 1%. consistent with the rally we saw yesterday. remarkable. the xetra dax adding .1%. for its part, up to close to 30% this year. the ftse 100 adding .3. the bond space, we'll look at that and talk later about the big trades that have helped some hedge funds, for example, when it comes to greek debt. for the time being, mario's comments this summer is have techively kept the bond gleelds a tight range since then six months or so now, this is going. and differentiation across the space where italy price rising, not the case for spain which is seeing its yield up to 5.3. and i know we haven't mentioned this in a while, but i want to draw your attention here. the ten-year gild in the u.k., 1.957%. extraordinary. we're not off the 2% market in the spread, widening significantly. coming up on the program today, the count is set to get underway in south korea following general elections. we'll head to seoul to find out whether the country could elect its first female leader. >>> the bank of england releases minutes from its latest polic
a rotation into safety, out of risk and out of spain and italy. about 4.5% for italy. thin trading in markets is exacerbating the move that we're seeing as we approach the year. today, the austy dollar is weaker against the u.s. dollar by about .4%. proxy there for global growth prospects. the dollar/yen is weaker by about .25%. this as markets digest the news out of the boj and gauge whether they'll be successful in boosting inflation ultimately. the euro/dollar, 1.3221. so for trading in asia, just how japan, china and the rest have been affected by fiscal cliff news, diedra morris is join onning us with plenty more. hi. >> hey, kelly. it was a bit of a rude awaking. a lot of these indexes were on their way to gains and then we had the fiscal cliff setback. we had news that john boehner's plan b failed. this all turned red and this is where we ended. the nikkei 225 coming back from that huge rally that we have seen over the last five weeks shedding 1%. the exporters hurt here because the dollar/yen was lower. it has regained some ground in the last few hours or so. the kospi shedding about
model in spain. >> first of all, warren buffett, there again i think the contradictory as of all of this is at play. on the one hand, yes, there have always been people like him on the side of the wealthy, the big corporations, who have a clear understanding that at a certain point it becomes dangerous to keep going in that direction. you cannot keep having a smaller and smaller number of people doing really well in a sea of people that are having a harder and harder time. pushing, but don't kill the goose that lays the golden egg in the end. so there are always voices like that. not the only one. there are a whole bunch of people like that to see that and to have the courage or the comfort or the security to say it. remember also, the same warren buffett he says that is a major owner of the moody's corporation , and the moody's corporation was a central player in providing aaa ratings for securities we now know were worthless, are worthless, fraudulent, and someone. and so, you know, he is as he would himself admit a part of the system and therefore draw and to many of the activ
. in spain, that means one in every four people are out looking for work and a dependent on state aid. >> but it is not all bad news. ireland has managed to turn its major recession around and is now posting gains thanks to a lifeline from the e you. >> two years ago, ireland receive more than 67 billion euros from the eu bailout fund, and the money appears to have helped. the government was able to sink its annual deficit from 32% to 8.5% of gdp, and it is paying much lower interest on government bonds, and the irish economy is growing. only unemployment remains stubbornly high. in october, the jobless rate was still above the eurozone average at 14.7%, but in countries hard hit by the euro crisis, there were even more people out of work, and an increase, and employment is one of 25%. in spain, 26% were one in two young people is out of work. things are not quite that grim in italy, but more and more young people are looking for work. the youth unemployment rate is 36%, the highest since june 2004. >> we have to take a short break, but when we back, december 1 is world aids day. we w
brushoff warnings that the programs might not reduce greek debt enough. spain has formally asked for almost 40 billion euros in aid for its troubled banking sector. >> a strong indication that we have been successful in stabilizing the eurozone. spain now leads -- need less than originally assumed. the situation has improved. >> another trouble spot is cyprus. the country needs a bailout of between 10 billion euros and 17 billion euros. officials are waiting for our report on the island's banks. >> we now turn to our brussels correspondent. can you give us more details on how the buyback plan came about? >> the buyback program is supposed to help greece reduce its debt within a short period of time. that is a vital condition for the next tranche of funds that greece needs can be paid out. they gave the green light last week to pay out the money. they said they needed to have the greek debt burden reduced. the country is now trying to do that. it has put 20 bonds out on the market earlier this year. it is offering to buy them back at a very attractive price for investors. if that is successf
concerned about france and spain than i am about italy. >> we'll talk about those. >> let me add asking. if italy is in this situation now, it relied on the easy way out. and politicians, including berlusconi, didn't have the foresight to see that. >> thank you so much for coming by. >>> staying at the eurozone, investors will be watching for anything coming from the italian crisis. the results of the spanish bond actions are due around 12:40 cst. hsbc was hit with a $1.9 billion fine. the ceo said we accept responsibility for our mistakes and are profoundly sorry for them. >> a full year loft loss of 4.7 billion euros, thinksen krup has more details. >> they are starting to look at the positive of what i would call a -- strategy, i.e., a clean sweep when it comes to the business strategy of thyssenkrupp as well as the instruct occur and the refocusing on being transparent and definitely being something shareholders should trust. so no dividends, jobs may go and the sale of celiamerica being looked at. the cfo says there's a handful of interested parties in that particular party of the
for into religious and intercultural dialogue. the three founding nations -- saudi arabia, spain, and austria -- were represented by their foreign ministers. among the 600 guests was the united nations secretary- general. the saudi government provided some 15 million euros in funding for the dialogue center for the first three years. >> we are most grateful to his majesty for his farsighted decision to launch this important and timely initiative. austria is greatly honored at the center is established. >> a outside the palace, greens and liberal muslim protesters point out that even as saudi arabia promotes religious dialogue in vienna, and to commit human rights abuses at home. >> it is a shame and a disgrace for austria and spain to have provided the saudis a center like this as a platform for their views in europe and all the world. >> the center is headquartered in this palace in vienna. representatives of all the world religions are invited to come here and engage in constructive dialogue. critics are predicting endless rounds of unproductive chatter and worry that saudi arabia could indeed use
in spain. in keeping the peace, how far should the police be able to go? that is a question that has been raised after some people have been left severely injured. country,in's basque police officers train with a new weapon. they will use it at demonstrations when things turn violent. the weapons afire these, the rounded tip of which is made of a heart from. they can be fired accurately at a distance of up to 50 meetings. in this region, they will have a weapon which fires these rubber balls. the new weapons can be fired directly at the troubled maker but the rubber bullets are first fired at the ground. the idea is that they will bounce up towards their intended target. the police will stop using this weapon after a rubber ball hit a man back in april and he later died. more questions follow the case, this woman who is blind in one eye. she was hit at a demonstration in barcelona last month. >> i knew straight away that he was really serious. i knew that my i was missing. i really don't understand that. you can demonstrate for your rights, the police charge that you like you are at a sta
. >> it is a rare thing for you. hang around long enough, it will go your way. thanks for that. >> cheers. >>> spain. the treasury is setting up three, seven, and ten-year bonds. they're now pre-funding for 2013. we've got the results of that in around about 30 minutes. >>> and china and india secretary growth slowed in november. analysts say china and india's nonmanufacturing team expected to improve thanks to a hiring boost in the mainland as well as strong new orders in india. at the same time, china's new leadership, as we pointed out, has laid out some fresh directives. >> these are some pretty sweeping reforms making china's famously inefficient bureaucracy more efficient. it's an effort to "win the confidence and the support of the people" as public backlash rose against the special treatment of politicians. so a new list of dos and don't's for chinese leaders. on the do side, cut down on giving face. the art of extreme flattery or reverence, which results in some very long meetings and speeches. keep them short and cut down on the lavish feasts. he's also encouraging more travel to rural par
. and, of course, it is recognized. >> what's your view on spain? the country managed to avoid bailout so far, but will not meet its deficit target for the full year. do you think spain should be given more time? >> well, first of all, i think that, again, spain is going in the right direction. when you look at the current account, the deficit, you see that it had been diminished massively since the peak that they had in 2008, 2009. and, you know, as a very short summing up, it's been divided by more than five, though it's very, very encouraging. on the other hand, you have unit labor costs which have been diminishing quite a lot and the exports of spain are very dynamic today. so it also demonstrates that hard work is being done. it's difficult. it's tough, but going in the right direction. i trust that the global observers are observing progressively and the adjustment is proceed. in spain and in all the countries that are under adjustment. >> now, lonmin's ceo ian farmer is stepping down while being treated for a serious illness after being first admitted to hospital back in august.
. the ministers also talked about spain. they decided to provide up to nearly $40 billion euros. they're decision came after the bailout fund to sure up its constituti institutions. the nikkei average at 9,434. that's a loss of one-fourth of a percent. the dollar is slightly losing ground. dollar yen changing hands at 82.13 to 17. euro stands at 107.19 to 24. analysts say investors are selling the dollar following the release of u.s. manufacturing data. it was the lowest in almost three and a half years. more investors are showing interest in the weakening yen. taking a look at other markets, south korea's kospi is trading lower. let's take a look at australia. it's trading lower by almost a third of a percent. there's hope for floundering bas bas basic electronics firm sharp. the firm is expected to receive part of the that sum as early as this month. sharp is forecasting a record net loss for the current fiscal year of $5.5 billion. that's due to the slump in its main tv and crystal liquid sectors. strengthening its financials is essential if the firm will have hope for its business. the two co
at the moment, but how did we ever let these excesses of housing here, housing in spain, housing elsewhere, in ireland, in this japan earlier -- in japan earlier, remember those days when you used to talk about the property around the imperial palace in tokyo, and a few hundred acres was equal to the value of all the real estate in california. now, that was real -- i don't know if it was true, but each to talk about -- but even to talk about it was a sense of how extremely -- [inaudible] >> do you share the, when you talk to fed officials, do you share -- >> i'm off the record here? >> no, not now. [laughter] no, no, you're fully mic'd. [laughter] when i talk to a fed official up there because happens to be power within the cia, um, they reveal and betray certain kind of frustration with the criticism they've been subjected including the criticism that they're easing too much because they say, well, that was the only course of action. we couldn't have done anything else in the face of a pretty -- political class. do you share that? >> well, they got it in both directions, and, you know, i
. in countries like spain, up to one-half of young people are unemployed. under the european union boss proposed scheme, everyone under 25 who applies -- european union's proposed scheme, everyone under 25 who applies would be guaranteed a job or training within four months. >> we have to invest in europe's young people. we cannot afford to leave them. we have to give them the skills and experience they need to help them to get a job. >> the eu wants to fund the sceme -- scheme with money from the european bond. many are skeptical of the plans. >> i do not believe the suggestions will be successful. employers will be afraid of giving people work, so it will hurt those it's trying to help. >> whether it will really create more education and training programs is still unclear, as the suggestions are only recommendations to eu member states. >> bayern face off against a byelorussian team tonight. >> boresoff beat them in november. bayern are in top form. >> as if they were not scoring enough goals already, goetze is ready to go. he is first choice again in the champions' league. bayern are looking
's the bund or even yields in spain are falling as prices rise a little bit. so there is light at the end of the tunnel according to our next guest. he says the global economy is close to reaching its weakest point before recovery sets in. he's robert cohen, chief equity strategist. woke. >> good morning. >> we just heard rob doddson talking through some of these results. unfortunately, we saw some signs of weaker demand, especially global demand in these reports. but perhaps what is consistent with what you're saying, why is it your view that that is going to happen? >> sometimes you need to pull away. you move away from the fundamentals a little bit on the month to month improvements. if you look at 2013 as a whole, the big headwinds you've had in a number of years, fiscal austerity is largely the sarp in europe year on year. 2014, that comes up quite quickly. 2013 is largely going to be the final year of the crushing deleveraging if you like on the european banks. so essentially the whole theme of the aurm is 2014 should credibly be the first recovery year we've been in years. >> 2013?
] how can power consumption in china, impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> welcome back to squawk. happy monday. today in the "wall street journal" suggesting netflix could end up doomed with its success with children. netflix just for kids get more popular. companies like viacom get accurate. companies provide netflix with most of its content in a kids' focused section. the journal says at some point the suppliers will probably want to charge netflix more or they might even stop selling to netflix. that's been a huge problem for them when it comes to contend more broadly. >> time for the global markets report. kelly evans standing by in london. you rise above over
of hijacking the government. >> put us on a very slippery slope towards the plight of greece and spain and others who basically don't have that check. this whole notion of unlimited credit card is just pure poppycock and it's something that only can be dreamed of as a fiscally responsible thing in washington, d.c. >> but, you know, you still have a process and procedure in terms of the budget where the president proposes a budget and congress is playing a much more significant role in that process. when the time at which the idea of, you know, approving the debt ceiling was when congress was playing less of a role in the budget process. congress is far more engaged in that process. so, i don't think this is about going the way of greece or spain as much as it is, you know, people like to hold on to as much power as long as they think they can. >> karen -- >> ken, take a listen to what tom cole said earlier this week on taxes. take a listen to this. >> in my view we all agree that we are not going to raise taxes on people who make less than $250,000. we should take them out of this disc
exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment information, risks, fees and expenses try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. >>> what's a few billion dollars among friends? anyway, last month republican senator marco rubio punted on the question of how old the earth is, calling it a great mystery. it's not a mystery it's what the potential presidential candidate for 2016 was playing to the large number
that is bursting now increase. or maybe that's bursting in spain. other countries in europe think back two or three years ago. was just as broke as it is today. yet they were able to borrow money and they paid a lower interest rates and everything was fine. it wasn't fine. it's just the bond holders were asleep. they were oblivious to the circumstances. and eventually they woke up and they demanded a higher rate of interest to compensate for the risk of holding the paper and now the government can't afford a higher interest rate, and now people realize that so they want their money back. so now there is a crisis. the only reason that we can service our debt is because the rate is so low. we can't be pay our debt. that's not even possible. all we can do is service the debt but of course once our creditors realize we can't, then they are going to want their money back and we can't pay it back. we can print it but then it isn't going to be worth very much. the key is going to be when are the creditors going to wake up and demand a rate of return on the dollar's? because right now the rate is zero and
, which the germans said they should do, they should have done three years ago they'd be better off. spain is the immediate problem, you have 26% unemployment which is non-performing loans. >> we have to go, 2,200 pages of health care, i'm sure the notes spain's taken how greece has got money at every turn, their pile is a bigger pile than the health care plan. >> i could listen to you guys talk all day long. that was a great conversation. yra, rick, thanks so much. see you in a bit. >>> zynga stock popping. julia boorstin is live in l.a. with more. >> good morning to you, carl. this is the first of many steps before zynga can make money from online gambling. applying for a real money gaming license in nevada is a sign of zynga's seriousness creating new revenue streams. it sent it up as much as 9% higher today. the company warns it will take as much as a year and a half to get approval in nevada but the biggest step of all is a change in federal law, and if online gambling does become legal nationwide, zynga is sure to face some big competition from the casinos. zynga is struggling to sel
so far. europe is moving things. not the united states. spain also by the way we didn't talk about this they officially asked for european funds to recapitalize their banking sectors. that's also a bit of good news. i want to talk about china because i got a lot of calls and questions about my comments last week on china. have you noticed we got good news on the manufacturing overnight on china. better than expected. november better than expected. the pmi numbers. guess the whole world went up. korea went up. everything went up except china. a lot of comments last week about what exactly is happening in china because china -- mainland china stock market is among of the worst performers for the whole year. we're down 11% in shanghai this year. hong kong is up 18%. how do you explain this? this was a huge debate in the last couple of weeks and of course a lot of people are@@ pointing to the fact that there's less stimulus than expected coming from the government. they haven't said anything but that's not the problem. this has been going on now for months and months on end. selling sh
than greece, more than spain. but conversely, china, if gdp is coming back, they are in what many consider to be a sweet spot. >> the numbers came out saturday for china. i think italy has been remarkably good. so this was a big game changer. italy had been a part of the good story of european recovery. now it's back. >> all to monti was never intended to be there for the long term. >> sure. >> in fact, he may be leaving a month earlier than originally planned. this should not be a surprise in the larger context. while we may mention berlusconi's name right now, he's not expected to win. >> look, we knew that monti was successful. >> it may be whoever follows him is going to roll some of the gains that he's had. so-called gains. >> that's going to cause ripples here. look, on saturday night, i said, we're going to have a nice opening. china's good, people know that monti is not really going to hurt italy. i think if china continues the momentum, but the number -- >> the ex sports were less than expected in the month of november. which is a concern. then there's this perverse glass
and that is a game leapfrog. we end up with more debt and a weaker economy. the road map is greece, italy, spain, all over europe but the president thinks you can tax-and-spend your way to prosperity. >>neil: what the administration throws back on the issue is take a look at italy and greece, austerity has worked. you say what? >>guest: they have a strange definition. alwaysst either to them means higher taxes in europe and the united states austerity means less spending. i am in favor of the right definition of austerity. the balkan countries got out of the mess and now they are doing well economically because they cut, not just cut spending in the washington sense of increasing it at a slower rate they spent less one year after the other and now they are out of the trouble. if you understand the right definition of austerity is the way to go, the problem is in most of europe it means higher taxes, obama wants to give us the bad part of europe, without the good part. >>neil: thank you very much. they are not cutting anything. just slowing the growth. rebound and former president bill clinton hitting
together? we look at spain and portugal and ireland even, get your act together. you know the problem. shake out of it. what's the world thinking when they look at us? setting up the fiscal cliff, a man-made challenge, what do they think of us? >> actually, they look at us and think we're going to work it out. >> to put it differently, they can't believe we will screw up. >> they're kind of thinking about the debt ceiling debate. they're not following this like we are. and they remember the last time we were in a situation. >> last time we got downgraded. >> it didn't seem to have much economic impact. people are just looking at us figure, oh, you know those crazy americans, they'll work it out at the last minute. >> what will they say if they get up january 2nd or 3rd after the new year and see we didn't work it out. >> it's my hope, towards later december, we'll actually have -- i want to convince people on the right, i think it's the president's job to convince the slower learners on the republican side that this is serious business. and we have a deal now, as if you know what's go
seems to be fixed. it's fixed. even though they're in a bit of a recession, a lost generation in spain, are they really fixed? we'll ask mark grant the tough questions bottom of the hour. , we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 locations, where our dedicated support teams help you know more so your money can do more. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our teams have the information you want when you need it. it's another reason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. >>> facebook experiencing its fourth lockup today. today 160 million shares hitting the market. our next guest is an author of the book "the facebook era" clara shih the president of a company that has enterprises with large store networks on facebook linked in and other social networks. welcome back and good to see you again. >> good to see you. thanks for having me. >> i wonder what your take is short term on the lockup expiration. we've had it both ways this year. where
we go, ah. but it is amazing. nothing we can do. >> we're afraid spain is going to come -- spain was supposed to come to market. italy, oh, my, what happens when italy -- it turns out you had to take it down. i know that john corzine, very controversial figure. that's a code word. but what a trade they almost had. in the news again today. >> almost. >> horseshoes, hand grenades. >> we should point out, gm was certainly not having the easiest of times of it. this morning's stock is up sharply, we're telling you why. the company will buy back at a premium to at least what was the market price as of yesterday, 200 million shares from the government at $27.50. that having the effect of sending the stock above that. why not, if you're gm, you've got all this cash sitting on your balance sheet. you're earning virtually nothing on it, why not take the opportunity, even at a premium, to buy it back by as much as 11%, shrinking the cap by that much. we heard from tim massad who runs t.a.r.p., they'll be dribbling out the shares over time. the next 12 to 15 months. similar to the strategy
at the beauty pageant. they tonight want to put their money in greece, spain or portugal, so they're putting it here. our interest rates are so low. that's not going to last forever. be you go back up to a long-term average of 6-8%, we add a trillion dollars in debt service and cost interests over ten years. the interest alone will swallow up half of our federal expenditures. we'll be paying china for their military. we can't allow this to happen. and i think that's one of the reasons why we're so proud to do this book, is we really are putting policies in place and gentlemen, regardless of who's president in january 2013, they're going to face the exact same problems we have today. somebody has to tackle it, and part of what this action-oriented institute is doing, this book is doing is putting those ideas out there so we can start having a discussion about, one, the importance is real, we're here today, and here's how you get reform in place with pro-growth policies. we've talked about the idea of greece and their debt crisis, economic studies have looked back over history about when do co
and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. let me give you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. in the deficit regions. this is not philanthropy. this is an act of recycling surplus so the surpluses of the surplus state can continue to be created, produced. you may recall that in the 1920s, internationally, we had a gold standard. fixed exchange rates. it is like having a single economy. that gold standard creates a a degree of growth, together with the emergence of state corporations like edison that allows the bankers to run riot, to bring value to the peasant and to recycle. and that is what led to the collapse of 1939, which was t
over the weekend. the ibex down over the weekend. so spain and portugal, seeing its index down over more than is % is showing its concern. joe, the ftse is at least holding up relatively better. it's down only .3% today. these losses follow a trading session that was setting up to be relatively strong. we saw asian stoxx doing decently well, so just kind of underscores how unhappy the market is this morning with this news out of italy. look at what's happening with debt. as we check in with bond markets, the italian tenure is seeing its yield rise. 4.88%. i know it doesn't seem that high, given some levels we were at last year. but if you consider that we've risen, i don't know, in the range of 30 to 40 basis points or .3 percentage points just on this news, it is pretty significant. spain, same thing, we're seeing 5.67 about the level there. other bond yields are benefiting as a result. back over to you guys. i'm sure carolin, too, can help us try to understand now what this all means with mario monti potentially still involved with the next eye toolan government. that may help rea
the board as investors did show up. if we flip over to spain in particular, we can take a look at the three-year over here. a bid to cover ratio of 4.8%. one indication certainly of the kind of indications there are where the ecb is expected to be the most active if and when these countries have to access their bailout programs. now we're seeing prices in spain sell off a little bit. the ten-year, just under 5.4% is the level there. for the longer dated papers, investors are a little bit more wary. now, that news coming out of the euro group meeting, i wanted to show you the euro/dollar as we wrap up today's global market support. it's still down .1%, 1.3056. that would tell you that the resolution is largely priced in. now as focus moves into the start of next year, a couple of the key questions will be how much mario draghi follows ben bernan bernanke's caps, maybe even cutting into positive territory. expect to hear plenty more about that in the weeks to come. but for now, some resolution means this is front and center for these fiscal cliffs. back over to you guys. >> kelly, have your b
and spain. our road map starts right where we were months ago, waiting for the 112th congress to agree on a debt reduction package. the senate convenes at 11:00 a.m. >> the dow had its worst day in a month on friday. set to close december with a loss. the question is, does it continue to sell off if there isn't an accord in congress. >> we will always have china. manufacturing pmi data from last night is the best in 21 months. can we finally say the chinese economy has been stabilized. >> but of course, we start in washington. as you know, congress comes back today. the house gaveling into session now with legislative business starting at 10:00 a.m. the senate returns at 11:00 a.m. eastern. there are only a few hours left to get a deal done. eamon? >> you're already hearing people talk the way they talk on new year's day. a lot of people wish they could go back in time and do things differently. that's the way people are talking in washington about this fiscal cliff. feeling as if this thing suddenly got off the rails. take a listen to mitch mcconnell last night talking about the pace
that was in terrible shape to begin with and i think you have a lot of austerity fatigue going on spain, italy, portugal, certainly greece. so you have those economic woes. the euro is not going to thrive and it may survive thanks to the ecb, but you're not going to get that economy to thrive, and the fiscal union ask those are very slow going and though they may be moving quickly by european standards and i've been given the magnitude of the problem going very slowly. >> how should people be thinking about this? the average american, and they've been hearing about it for so long and they're not sure it will affect their pocketbook. do you think they will? >> and there's this incredible chance that greece will leave and the dominos will begin to fall. i think that's unluikely to happen as long as the ecb is willing to support that currency, but will it thrive? will those economies boom? i don't think so, i think it will be another year of recession and you will find individual opportunities and the stock picker's market and far as it's a strong growth, they're not there yet. >> thanks so much
it was dubai and bp oil spill or greece or spain or the deleveraging or foreclosures. any of these things that we're supposed to take us out and yet we keep moving. i think the fiscal cliff is another one of these. >> let me ask you about the timing then. deutsche bank had a note out yesterday where they suggested that central banks have bought us a six months of time on the markets. if pmis do not improve, will we see growth? what would you say to that view? >> i mean, i'm pretty simple on this. i do not believe and we could debate this probably all day that quantitative easing itself has helped the economy at all. banks put that money right back to the fed as excess reserves. it hasn't boosted money in the economy. i don't believe that we've seen a false rally or sugar high. i think the growth in the economy and growth in the markets has been driven by productivity and profits. i think it's real. it's slow. it's real. we're going to have a weak fourth quarter. i believe most of that weakness is because of sandy. we're going to pick up later in the quarter. we'll have 2.5% to 3% growth n
the various government actions. look at wages in greece and now spain. wages in greece are down more than 25%. very painful, but we've heard about the pain already. what we haven't heard so much about is the competitiveness. >> enor husband costs with incredibly high unemployment rates. >> that i'm afraid is what's going on and that's extremely unpleasant. what i'm saying in terms of market action is we know about that, we're focused already on the unemployment, we're not focused on the wage improvement in competitiveness. >> all right giles, more to come from you you. also we'll hear from the stars of les mis about why the classic story will resonate with the current economic climate. and later in the program, we'll also hear from the nigerian finance minister about the resources boom. but you what about the corruption issue. and we'll also hear first from apple's new ceo tim cook about steve jobs' legacy and his future plans for the tech giant. plus of course we'll continue to keep you updated on the reaction and the latest dealings from the earthquake in japan. >>> a 7.3 magnitude earthqu
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 68 (some duplicates have been removed)